Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
September 16, 2014

Posts in "Marco Rubio"

May 31, 2014

Iowa Senate Primary Becomes 2016 Battleground

Iowa Senate Primary Becomes 2016 Battleground

Perry supports a candidate for Senate in Iowa. (Tom Williams/CQRoll Call File Photo)

The campaign trail in Iowa this week might look a little familiar: As Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry stump around the state, former Sen. Rick Santorum’s face is plastered on the local airwaves.

The 2012 presidential primary is long gone, but a couple of the GOP’s future presidential hopefuls are using the Senate primary in the crucial nominating state to their advantage.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., has backed the GOP front-runner, state Sen. Joni Ernst. Romney, who is not expected to run in 2016, has also given her his support. Meanwhile, Perry has endorsed former District Attorney Matt Whitaker. Santorum is supporting radio host Sam Clovis. A fourth candidate in the race, former energy executive Mark Jacobs, does not have any endorsements from likely presidential candidates.

The contest marks a rare opportunity for 2016 hopefuls: There hasn’t been an open-seat Senate race in the Hawkeye State in three decades. By backing a Senate candidate, presidential prospects can cement relationships with them and their staff that could be valuable next cycle — no matter if their chosen Republican wins or loses.

“The caucuses are an activist-driven process and activists put a premium on who stands with them,” said Republican radio host Steve Deace, who has endorsed Clovis.

“After all,” he added, “if you’re going to ask activists to stand with you, they’ll want to know if you stood with them.” Full story

March 6, 2014

Potential 2016 Contenders Dominate CPAC Lineup

Potential 2016 Contenders Dominate CPAC Lineup

Rand will return to CPAC to speak on Friday. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Five Republicans who could share a presidential primary debate stage next year will all deliver speeches by lunchtime at today’s start of the Conservative Political Action Conference.

Potential 2016 White House contenders, elected officials and conservative darlings are lining up over the next few days to address thousands of conservative activists descending on the nation’s capital for the annual retreat.

The three-day program kicks off with a speech by Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, a freshman who’s built substantial support within the conservative movement since his upset victory in 2012. Other possible presidential candidates following him on the main ballroom stage throughout the morning include (in order of appearance) House Budget Chairman Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. Full story

November 1, 2013

Can These 2016 Prospects Seek Higher Office and Re-Election?

Can These 2016 Prospects Seek Higher Office and Re Election?

Rubio could run for president in 2016. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Senate class of 2010 produced a handful of GOP rising stars, some whom may run for president or vice president as soon as 2016.

But the timing presents a problem for these Republicans: Not all states allow candidates to appear on a ballot twice. This would negate their ability to run for re-election to the Senate and president or vice president at the same time.

Roll Call often addresses this issue in its weekly series “Farm Team,” which examines the future candidates and politicking in every state. Here is how three could-be contenders stack up with state laws: Full story

April 15, 2013

Remainders: They Work Hard for the Money

Congressional candidates work hard for the money, and it shows in the first-quarter fundraising reports filed on Monday.

This quarter, seven figures marked the high bar for Senate campaign fundraising bragging rights — a large sum for hauls from this early in the cycle.

To be sure, the political fundraising market is different in every state (for example, it’s easier for incumbents to raise money in New Jersey than Alaska). But across the map, senators seeking re-election in 2014 — most of whom of are Democrats — raised big bucks.

Here’s a roundup of Monday’s fundraising announcements and filings: Full story

March 16, 2013

Rand Paul Edges Out Marco Rubio in CPAC Straw Poll

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., won the Conservative Political Action Conference straw poll on Saturday, edging out fellow Sen. Marco Rubio. He follows in the footsteps of his father, former Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, who was a perennial CPAC straw poll winner.

Paul took 25 percent with Rubio garnering 23 percent at the annual event that took place at National Harbor, Md., this year. This comes about a week after Paul’s Senate floor filibuster that created the Twitter hashtag “StandWithRand.” The motto translated at CPAC – some of the biggest souvenir hits were Mad Men logo “Stand With Rand” stickers and t-shirts that featured Paul’s silhouette.

Other top finishers followed in this order:

  • Former Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pa. got 8 percent
  • Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J. got 7 percent
  • Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. got 6 percent
  • Gov. Scott Walker, R-Wis. got 5 percent

March 15, 2013

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

The Conservative Political Action Conference is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year in a new location: across the D.C. line (but still within the Beltway) at National Harbor, Md. Although it’s a new location, the event remains a central focus this week for the Washington press corps, including team coverage from CQ Roll Call.

The event wraps up Saturday with straw poll results announced around 5 p.m.

Here are some of the highlights of CQ Roll Call’s coverage of the three-day conservative cattle call:

Below are some of the best shots captured Thursday and Friday by our award-winning photographers:

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)

 

Scenes from #CPAC2013 (PHOTOS)

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

February 12, 2013

Live Blog: Obama’s 2013 State of the Union Address

11:15 p.m.: Thus concludes the State of the Union live blog. Obama delivered a rather energetic speech, with some added policy flairs, such as a proposed minimum wage increase, to his usual government-centered approach. Democrats are likely to be very happy with what they heard, and Republicans not so much, leaving as still unknown the prospects for bipartisan cooperation on looming fiscal issues such as the budget and the debt ceiling.

Rubio’s rebuttal, meanwhile, will initially be remembered for that reach for a gulp of water in the middle of his speech — at least on social media. But for the difficult task that the rebuttal is, Rubio performed capably and probably helped his career because of it.

Good night from Roll Call in Washington.

10:16 p.m.: Obama concludes. Next up, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida with the Republican rebuttal.

10:10 p.m.: The president is closing his State of the Union address with an emotional appeal for Congress to take up Democratic gun control legislation that he is pushing. While some proposals have bipartisan support, many of them do not. “They deserve a vote,” is a phrase the president is repeating over and over. “Gabby Giffords deserves a vote,” he says. “The families of Newtown deserve a vote.” — “The families of Aurora deserve a vote.” — The families of Oak Creek, and Tucson, and Blacksburg …”

This portion of the #SOTU is likely to stick the most with Democrats, at least. Easily the emotional portion of Obama’s address.

10:08 p.m.: “It has been two months since Newtown,” Obama says.

10 p.m.: Obama calls for the federal government to address threats to U.S. cybersecurity, as part of the latter sections of the State of the Union that declared victory over the “core” elements of al-Qaida in Afghanistan and vowed to prevent Iran from acquiring or developing nuclear weapons capability. The Iran comment drew the most bipartisan applause. Less noted by the members but sure to generate much opposition from Republicans: the president’s proposal for the U.S. to unilaterally reduce its nuclear weapons stockpile to set an example.

9:45 p.m.: Immigration makes an appearance, and for the first time it appears that most in the chamber, Democrat and Republican, stand and applaud, with some cheering to boot. Interestingly enough, Obama does not call specifically for a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants though he suggests that legalization should involve “going to the back of the line” behind those trying emigrate legally.

9:40 p.m.: Speech is full of the usual Obama flourishes — “reasonable” this, “common sense” that — expressions of incredulity that certain issues engender partisanship. But unusual for any president’s State of the Union, far fewer applause interruptions than normally occur. Meanwhile, Biden exhibits his usual earnestness as he looks on. Boehner actually looks less grumpy than in the past.

Full story

January 17, 2013

Rubio to Speak at CPAC Conference

Rubio to Speak at CPAC Conference

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio will speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference in March, becoming the latest potential 2016 Republican presidential hopeful confirmed to address the annual event.

Rubio joins House Budget Chairman Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., and Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who the American Conservative Union previously announced would speak at the gathering of conservative activists.

CPAC is a regular stop for members of Congress and presidential candidates alike, and two-time presidential candidate Mitt Romney even used the forum in 2008 to announce the end to his campaign. This year’s event will be held March 14-16 at the National Harbor outside Washington, D.C.

January 11, 2013

Ryan to Speak at CPAC

Ryan to Speak at CPAC

Ryan is slated to speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference in March. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Budget Chairman Paul D. Ryan is scheduled to address the Conservative Political Action Conference in March, the American Conservative Union announced Friday.

The Wisconsin congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee is a regular at the annual gathering and is considered a potential White House candidate for 2016.

“From the day he was elected, Chairman Ryan has been a strong voice in Congress for pro-growth, free market economic policies and has always been a CPAC favorite,” ACU Chairman Al Cardenas said in a statement. Full story

January 2, 2013

Reading the Tea Leaves for 2014 and Beyond in Cliff Vote

Reading the Tea Leaves for 2014 and Beyond in Cliff Vote

Capito, the only House member currently running for Senate in 2014, voted no on the fiscal cliff bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Late-night votes on the fiscal cliff package capped off New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day this week — and delivered the first politically significant vote of the 2014 cycle.

That’s especially true for House Republicans fearful of possible primary challenges this cycle. A host of conservative organizations, including the Club for Growth and Family Research Council, encouraged Republicans to vote against the deal that raised taxes on wealthy Americans and made the Bush-era tax cuts permanent. The House passed the fiscal cliff bill with bipartisan support, but the majority of House Republicans voted against it.

To be sure, this bill probably will not cost members as much politically as, for example, votes for the Troubled Asset Relief Program in 2008 or the president’s health care overhaul in 2010. Still, it’s the first major vote of the 2014 cycle, and politicians looking for a promotion took note: Full story

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