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September 1, 2014

Posts in "Ore. Senate"

August 19, 2014

Jeff Merkley Touts Efforts to Stop Outsourcing in New Ad

Jeff Merkley Touts Efforts to Stop Outsourcing in New Ad

Jeff Merkley is seeking re-election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call))

Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., is going up with a new ad Tuesday focusing on his efforts to prevent companies from outsourcing jobs.

Merkley speaks directly to the camera in the positive spot, provided first to CQ Roll Call, describing his father working at a mill when he was growing up.

“As men and women clock in across the state, thousands of hands are building a stronger Oregon. But there are still special interests that want to give tax breaks to corporations that ship our jobs overseas,” Merkley says.

Full story

August 4, 2014

Top 10 Most Vulnerable Senators

Top 10 Most Vulnerable Senators

In 2014 Senate races, Pryor is one of the most vulnerable Democrats. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Three months before Election Day, it’s clear some senators may not return to Congress after the midterms — and that’s mostly good news for Republicans.

The GOP’s path to the Senate majority includes a mix of open seats and targeted Democratic incumbents. The two most vulnerable seats are in South Dakota and West Virginia, where Democratic senators are retiring. Republicans also have opportunities in open seats in Iowa and, to a lesser degree, Michigan.

But even if they are victorious in those states, the GOP must defeat at least two incumbents to reach the net six seats needed for control.

Luckily for Republicans, Democrats make up the vast majority of endangered senators seeking re-election. The GOP has a lengthy catalog of states where it has an opportunity to win, though there is a wide gap betweenthe  No. 1 and No. 10 most vulnerable senators — who are ordered by most likely to lose.

Roll Call’s “10 Most Vulnerable Senators” list will be updated monthly ahead of the Nov. 4 elections. For now, here is where the incumbents stand: Full story

July 17, 2014

Oregon Republican Raises $955,000 for Senate Bid

 

Oregon Republican Raises $955,000 for Senate Bid

Wehby is challenging Merkley, above. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Oregon Republican Monica Wehby will report raising more than $955,000 in her bid for Senate in the second quarter, according to fundraising figures provided first to CQ Roll Call.

Wehby, a pediatric neurosurgeon, is challenging incumbent Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley. She raised most of that haul — $846,000 — since May 1. Full story

May 21, 2014

Monica Wehby Wins GOP Senate Primary in Oregon

Pediatric neurosurgeon Monica Wehby clinched the Republican Senate nomination in Oregon on Tuesday, beating out state Rep. Jason Conger.

Wehby will now face Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley — who handily won his primary — in an uphill race for Republicans. She led Conger 55 percent to 32 percent when the Associated Press called the race with 52 percent of precincts reporting.

Merkley is running his first Senate re-election race after unseating Republican Sen. Gordon Smith in 2008.

The blue-state seat has not been a top target for national Republicans, who must pick up a net six seats to regain the Senate majority. But Wehby’s resume as a physician and strong first TV ad have Republicans optimistic they can expand the playing field into Oregon. Full story

November 28, 2012

Inside the 2014 Senate Races

Inside the 2014 Senate Races
Roll Call’s initial Senate ratings outlook projects a potentially bullish cycle for Republicans, with an opportunity to recapture the majority for the first time in eight years.

But that’s exactly how things looked two years before the 2012 elections, when Democrats surprised many with victories in Missouri and North Dakota on their way to picking up two seats. So the challenge for the GOP and incoming National Republican Senatorial Committee Chairman Jerry Moran of Kansas is to capitalize on their opportunities.

That and how voters feel about President Barack Obama in 2014 could determine how the parties fare at the ballot box less than two years from now. Democrats won their current majority in 2006, in the second midterm election under President George W. Bush.

Republicans are hoping Obama’s second midterm is similarly kind to them, if not equal to the president’s 2010 midterm shellacking, when the GOP won seven seats (and control of the House) despite beginning the cycle as the underdog.

Full story

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