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September 2, 2014

Posts in "Wyo. Senate"

March 7, 2014

A Campaign’s Favorite Spokesperson: the Daughter

A candidate recently aimed to make a positive impression on voters by starring his female offspring in a TV ad.

It happens nearly every cycle — and it did again last week, with a new Senate campaign spot from Rep. Steve Daines, R-Mont.

His two daughters, Annie and Caroline, told voters all about the positive points of his biography, highlighting the fact that he is a “fifth-generation Montanan.”

Full story

January 6, 2014

Enzi Encourages Prayers for Cheney Family After High-Fives on Senate Floor (Video)

Sen. Michael B. Enzi, R-Wyo., sought to tamp down the upbeat reception he received on the Senate floor Monday afternoon, emphasizing the severity of the medical situation that prompted Liz Cheney to drop her primary challenge in the Wyoming Senate race earlier in the day.

“Not many of them knew the reason that she was pulling out, so I asked for them to support her and her family with their prayers,” the Wyoming Republican told reporters outside the chamber.

A few minutes earlier, a group of senators greeted Enzi on the floor with high-fives.

Full story

Why It Didn’t Work for Liz Cheney

Liz Cheney cited family health concerns as her reason for dropping out of the Wyoming Senate race, but her exit Monday came after months of struggling to gain traction in a Republican primary challenge to Sen. Michael B. Enzi.

Nearly six months after announcing her first bid for public office, the campaign of the former State Department official and daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney had grabbed more headlines for causing intrafamily drama than for offering a decisive argument for her candidacy.

Cheney would have had another eight months to argue her case, but among the many reasons her campaign hadn’t erupted with support already was the fact that Wyoming voters simply still like Enzi. Now it will never be known whether she could have overcome that.

“It was never about people not liking Liz or the Cheney family,” said Joe Milczewski, a former campaign manager for the other Wyoming senator, Republican John Barrasso. “But voters like Sen. Enzi, they’ve pulled the lever for him two or three times before, and nobody likes to have to pick between two friends.” Full story

October 22, 2013

The 7 Republican Senators Most Vulnerable to a Primary

The 7 Republican Senators Most Vulnerable to a Primary

Enzi is vulnerable to a primary challenge in 2014. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Hard-line conservatives are rising out of the ashes of a weekslong government shutdown, emboldened by the possibility of adding to their ranks in the Senate next year — whether by picking up Democrat-held seats or taking out Republican incumbents.

Just two Republican senators have lost in primaries in the last two election cycles, but that’s not stopping a growing number of intraparty challengers this cycle. Conservative third-party groups and candidates hope to give more backup to folks like Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas and Mike Lee of Utah, who led an effort to defund the health care law.

The GOP brand overall may have taken a significant hit this month and caused at least some concern within the party about obtaining or keeping the majority in either chamber in the next couple of election cycles. But the shutdown only fueled challenges to sitting Republicans.

It’s still too early to know exactly how competitive many of the challengers can be. At this point, there is a big difference in the competitiveness of the races from the top three to bottom three on this list. And as the most recent fundraising reports to the Federal Election Commission illustrated, nearly all of the incumbents’ opponents are starting out in deep financial holes.

Still, with outside groups such as the Club for Growth and the Senate Conservatives Fund beginning to engage, a challenger’s money isn’t the only threat — and any of these races could theoretically take off.

Here are the seven Republican senators most vulnerable to a primary challenge, in order: Full story

October 10, 2013

Conservative Super PAC Ups Ad Buy Against Cheney

A conservative super PAC is increasing its TV ad buy against Liz Cheney, who is vying for the Republican Senate nomination in Wyoming.

American Principles Fund initially launched its ad on Monday for a one-week flight backed by $75,000. But the group announced Thursday that it has now invested $140,000 for a three-week run on statewide broadcast and cable. The ad hits Cheney on gay marriage.

Cheney is challenging Sen. Michael B. Enzi in the Republican primary. In a statement in August, Cheney said there was a push poll being conducted against her on this issue and that she is “not pro-gay marriage.”

The group is promising to invest further in this and other races around the country. Full story

August 30, 2013

Liz Cheney Accuses NRSC of Push Poll Against Her | #WYSEN (Updated)

Updated 4:21 p.m. | Republican Liz Cheney announced on Friday that she is against gay marriage and accused the National Republican Senatorial Committee of sponsoring a “push poll” against her.

“I am strongly pro-life and I am not pro-gay marriage,” Cheney said in a campaign news release.

She added that it is an issue that ought to be decided at the state level.

“I believe the issue of marriage must be decided by the states, and by the people in the states, not by judges and not even by legislators, but by the people themselves,” she added.

She voiced these opinions in the context of what her campaign alleged was a push poll which suggested that Cheney “supports abortion and aggressively promotes gay marriage.”

The statement included a sentence that tied the NRSC to the push poll. A push poll is typically a phony survey where the intent is not data collection but rather the dissemination of false information about a candidate.

“I call on Senator Enzi to denounce this poll and to tell the National Republican Senatorial Committee, or anyone else promoting untruths on his behalf, to stop,” Cheney added. Her spokeswoman, Celeste Colgan, tied Sen. Michael B. Enzi to the poll in the statement.

An NRSC spokesman told CQ Roll Call that they were “baffled by the statement and are not polling in Wyoming.” And an Enzi spokesman vigorously disputed Cheney’s allegation. Full story

July 22, 2013

Senate Republicans Dial for Dollars En Masse

Senate Republicans Dial for Dollars En Masse

Senators dialed for dollars during a NRSC fundraising drive last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Twenty-six senators raced in and out of the Ronald Reagan Republican Center last week with varying enthusiasm for a most-often-dreaded, but necessary, activity: fundraising.

Inside the National Republican Senatorial Committee’s marathon call day, even the GOP’s weakest fundraisers were on hand to dial for dollars to help the party gain the net six seats necessary to win the majority.

“I’m not real good at it, asking people to give money,” said Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama, who had one of the lowest fundraising hauls in the second quarter. “But I do, because it’s just part of it. People are nice when you talk to them. They understand the process.”

South Dakota Sen. John Thune made it look easy. He strolled in just after a vote, took a seat toward the back and placed a plastic cup of lemonade and bag of Nutter Butter cookies on the table. With the phone to his ear, he leaned back in his chair and said, “Hey, Al, how’s it going?” Al did much of the talking.

More than half of the caucus stopped in July 18 to fundraise for the NRSC, and CQ Roll Call was given exclusive access to the marathon call session.

The effort to get more senators personally involved was intended, in part, to help reverse a trend. Recently, Democrats have been far more generous in committee donations out of their personal campaign accounts.

In the 2012 cycle, 20 of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee’s top 25 largest contributors were senators’ campaigns, and they gave a total of $8.6 million, according to figures compiled by Political MoneyLine. By comparison, nine of the NRSC’s top 25 contributors were senators’ campaigns and collectively gave just more than $1 million. Many of the GOP’s top donations came from joint fundraising committees.

Full story

July 17, 2013

Senators Pick Up Fundraising Pace — Except Enzi

Sen. Michael B. Enzi’s sluggish fundraising over the first six months of the year wasn’t a problem until Tuesday, when Liz Cheney announced she would challenge the Wyoming Republican in a primary.

Suddenly the third-term incumbent, who has spent a total of $4.2 million in three drama-free elections to the Senate, is among a cadre of vulnerable incumbents preparing for costly contests in 2014.

Besides Enzi, who tied with another senator on retirement watch for the lowest second-quarter haul among incumbents, the rest of the targeted senators in the class are fundraising aggressively. In fact, most are keeping up with and, in some respects, surpassing the torrential fundraising pace of the 2012 cycle.

(See also: Roll Call’s 2014 Senate FEC Fundraising Chart)

Full story

July 16, 2013

Liz Cheney to Primary Enzi #WYSEN

Liz Cheney to Primary Enzi #WYSEN

Enzi has a primary challenger. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Liz Cheney, the eldest daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, announced on Tuesday that she will challenge Wyoming Sen. Michael B. Enzi next year in the Republican primary.

Cheney’s decision sets up what will undoubtedly be a spirited primary with Enzi, 69, who confirmed in a statement on Tuesday that he will indeed run for a fourth term. Full story

November 28, 2012

Inside the 2014 Senate Races

Inside the 2014 Senate Races
Roll Call’s initial Senate ratings outlook projects a potentially bullish cycle for Republicans, with an opportunity to recapture the majority for the first time in eight years.

But that’s exactly how things looked two years before the 2012 elections, when Democrats surprised many with victories in Missouri and North Dakota on their way to picking up two seats. So the challenge for the GOP and incoming National Republican Senatorial Committee Chairman Jerry Moran of Kansas is to capitalize on their opportunities.

That and how voters feel about President Barack Obama in 2014 could determine how the parties fare at the ballot box less than two years from now. Democrats won their current majority in 2006, in the second midterm election under President George W. Bush.

Republicans are hoping Obama’s second midterm is similarly kind to them, if not equal to the president’s 2010 midterm shellacking, when the GOP won seven seats (and control of the House) despite beginning the cycle as the underdog.

Full story

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