Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
December 18, 2014

Cruz, Lee Top Club for Growth’s 2013 Conservative Scorecard

Sens. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Mike Lee, R-Utah, were the only two senators to receive perfect scores from the Club for Growth for their 2013 voting records, according to the conservative group’s annual scorecards released Monday.

Four House Republicans, including three from Arizona — Matt Salmon, Trent Franks and David Schweikert — also had 100 percent rankings.

Scorecards like those released by Club for Growth and other groups like Heritage Action have played a significant role since the Republican takeover of the House in 2010 in pressuring lawmakers to hold the conservative line on votes the groups deem key. The club’s political action arm also financially supports primary challenges to low-scoring Republican incumbents, including Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran, who was one of the lowest-scoring Republicans last year.

“2013 saw the emergence of several new defenders of economic freedom as well as continued excellence among old allies,” Club for Growth President Chris Chocola said in a statement. “Some members have seen their voting records improve and will be honored this year with recognition of their efforts for the first time. While there are more champions of pro-economic growth policy serving in Congress than at any time before, it’s clear that our fight against the big spenders in both parties has a long way to go.”

Sens. Patrick J. Toomey of Pennsylvania, Marco Rubio of Florida, Rand Paul of Kentucky, Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, James M. Inhofe of Oklahoma, Tim Scott of South Carolina and Jim Risch of Idaho all had scores over 90 percent.

Using a scorecard like the one from the Club for Growth can help GOP incumbents stave off conservative challengers in primaries, though some questions had been raised about the efficacy of such devices by a growing group of Republicans in the wake of October’s government shutdown.

You can access the group’s full breakdown here.

  • bpai99

    This distinction also known as “The Least-Successful-in-Accomplishing-Goals-in-Congress Award.”

    Remember, success has nothing to do with achieving goals. To think it could be is so pre-21st Century. That’s why Ron Paul could run for President in 2012 with a straight face, having passed zero of his bills in over 30 years as a Congressman.

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