Roll Call: Latest News on Capitol Hill, Congress, Politics and Elections
February 12, 2016

February 4, 2016

Tim Scott Hits South Carolina Airwaves for Marco Rubio

Just days after endorsing Sen. Marco Rubio for president, Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina is hitting the airwaves back home for his GOP colleague from Florida.

The ad, obtained ahead of release by Roll Call, appears to be from the same video shoot as the endorsement video, as Scott’s shown by his childhood home.

Full story

February 3, 2016

Owens, Mills Outraising Incumbents in Rematches

UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 9: Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, runs down the House steps barefoot as she leaves the Capitol for the Columbus Day recess after final votes on Friday Oct. 9, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Love’s Democratic challenger outraised her by $25,000. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

In Utah’s ‘Safe Republican‘ territory, where Democrat Doug Owens is again vying for the 4th District seat he lost by 5 points in 2014, he is one of the rare rematch candidates to have raised more than the incumbent.

Freshman Republican Rep. Mia Love has been looking to solidify her hold in a district Mitt Romney carried by 37 points in 2012. She brought in $325,000 in the final three months of 2015, and spent $302,000 of it, leaving her with $781,000 in the bank. But Owens raised $350,000, spending only $135,000, and has $500,000 in the bank.

Wealthy Minnesota businessman Stewart Mills is making a second attempt to unseat the Democratic congressman who defeated him by a point and a half in 2014. Mills’ 4th-quarter fundraising report shows him raising $258,000 for his bid for the 8th District. That’s more than Rep. Rick Nolan’s $187,000, even excluding Mills’ $11,000 contribution to his own campaign. Nolan still has some $400,000 more in the bank.

In another House rematch, vulnerable New Hampshire Republican Frank Guinta was outraised by his Democratic opponent. Guinta, however, has been in hot water for campaign finance violations, and his Democratic opponent, Carol Shea-Porter, is a former member of Congress.

Shea-Porter raised $211,000 to Guinta’s $71,000. Although Guinta maintains a cash-on-hand advantage over Shea-Porter, he’ll have to make it through a primary before facing Democratic competition. His primary opponent, businessman Dan Innis, also outraised him, though by only about $20,000.

It’s much more typical, of course, for rematch challengers to lag in fundraising. That’s been the case in Maine’s 2nd District, where freshman GOP Rep. Bruce Poliquin, a member of the Financial Services Committee, has consistently raised more than Democrat Emily Cain, whom he defeated by 5 points in 2014. But only $61,000 separated their 4th quarter fundraising hauls. Thanks to a hefty 1st quarter haul, Poliquin’s cash on hand total still dwarfs Cain’s.

The same has been true in Texas’ 23rd District, the site of a rematch between Democratic former Rep. Pete Gallego and freshman GOP Rep. Will Hurd. Gallego raised $224,000 and has $424,000 in the bank. Hurd, as he has throughout the cycle, raised more, taking in $312,000 and leaving him with over $1 million in the bank.

In Illinois’ 10th District, Democratic former Rep. Brad Schneider has been raising serious money in his bid to take back the 10th District seat from Republican Rep. Robert J. Dold, but Dold is still raising more. The Republican raised $464,000 compared to Schneider’s $391,000. Dold also has more cash on hand.

Incumbency isn’t always a fundraising advantage. A number of challengers in competitive or closely-watched House races that aren’t rematches upended the incumbency-advantage narrative in the 3rd quarter. In Iowa’s 1st District, for example, Democrat Monica Vernon raised more than freshman Republican Rep. Rod Blum, one of the most vulnerable members of the House. She did so again in the 4th quarter.

In New Jersey’s 5th District, former Bill Clinton speech writer Josh Gottheimer again raised more than longtime GOP Rep. Scott Garrett, who angered some Republicans, including his Wall Street allies, when he said in July he wouldn’t contribute to the NRCC because of the committee’s support of gay candidates.

Tennessee GOP Rep. Scott DesJarlais has been outraised before; he barely won his 2014 primary and is facing what some have described as a more daunting challenger in young Republican Grant Starrett this year. Starrett again outraised DesJarlais this quarter, although Starrett’s $92,000 4th quarter haul is less impressive than the $733,000 haul (including a $227,000 personal loan) he reported in his first fundraising report.

The 4th quarter saw several challengers post higher numbers than incumbents for the first time. In Michigan’s 7th District, for example, Democratic state Sen. Gretchen Driskell raised more than four-term Republican Tim Walberg. Walberg only raised a few thousand dollars more than Driskell in the previous quarter, but his cash on hand has now grown to more than $1 million, while Driskell has only $604,000 in the bank.

California Republican Steve Knight’s fundraising got off to a rough start this cycle. He took in only $29,000 during the first quarter of 2015, but as a member of the National Republican Congressional Committee’s Patriot Program for vulnerable members, he got a significant boost in the 2nd quarter, posting an impressive $405,000 haul. He slipped again in the 3rd quarter, though, raising just $77,000. In the final quarter of 2015, his haul returned to the six-figures. But Democratic attorney Bryan Caforio, who got in the race in December, managed to raise $35,000 more in less time.

Contact Pathé at simonepathe@rollcall.com and follow her on Twitter at @sfpathe.

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Pat Toomey Endorses Marco Rubio for President

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.)

Toomey is up for re-election this year.

Updated: 5:30 p.m | Pennsylvania Sen. Patrick J. Toomey endorsed Sen. Marco Rubio for president Wednesday during an interview on CNN.

“We face a huge national security crisis, obviously, emanating from the Middle East. There is tension all across the world,” he said. “Marco has demonstrated clear understanding. He’s done the hard work, he’s knowledgeable, thoughtful and a smart guy.”

Full story

Rand Paul Suspends Presidential Campaign

UNITED STATES - JANUARY 18 - Rev. Robert Johnson, of Waukee, Iowa, asks a question to republican presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., at a campaign stop at Platinum Kutz barber shop in Des Moines, Iowa, on Monday, Jan 18, 2016. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Rev. Robert Johnson talks to Paul, R-Ky. at a campaign stop at Platinum Kutz barber shop in Des Moines ahead of the Iowa Caucuses. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul said Wednesday that he will suspend his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination, opting to focus instead on his on his re-election effort this year.

The announcement came two days after the libertarian-leaning senator finished fifth in the Iowa caucuses with just 4.5 percent of the vote, well behind the two other senators in the race who have gained much more traction, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.  Full story

In Iowa, Fight Over Democratic Votes Might Linger

UNITED STATES - FEB 1. - Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., greets supporters on the rope line at his caucus night rally at the Holiday Inn Des Moines Airport and Conference Center, on Monday, Feb. 1, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Sanders greets supporters on the rope line at his caucus night rally at the Holiday Inn Des Moines Airport and Conference Center on Monday. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

DES MOINES, Iowa — Has the Hanging Chad become the Hung-Up App?

In 2000, the site of poll workers evaluating whether “hanging chads” from paper ballots would be counted in the Florida presidential contest became a defining metaphor for the closeness of the election of George W. Bush over Al Gore.

In Iowa, in 2016, the closeness of the Democratic presidential caucuses has been underscored by stories throughout the state that the Microsoft application that precinct chairmen used to report results was experiencing delays, prompting the state party to enlist the campaigns to help track down the tallies in 90 precincts, or roughly 5 percent of the vote. Full story

Time Is Running Out for Senate Primaries Fundraising

Duckworth is running for Senate, opening the 8th District. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Duckworth has outraised her primary and general election opponents. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

For several of this year’s competitive Senate primaries, the fourth quarter of 2015 was the last fundraising quarter before primary day.

In Ohio, Illinois and North Carolina, voters go to the polls on March 15, a month before the next Federal Election Commission fundraising report deadline. In all three of those states, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee has backed the better-known candidate, who, unsurprisingly, raised more money from October through December of 2015. Full story

February 2, 2016

Baltimore the Battleground for Two Maryland Senate Candidates

Edwards and Van Hollen are running for Senate in 2016. (Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly File Photo)

With Cummings out of the Maryland Senate race, Baltimore, his hometown, will be key for Edwards and Van Hollen. (Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly File Photo)

In the political theater Maryland voters will see over the next nearly three months ahead of the April elections, the main characters in the state’s Democratic primary finally know their roles.

Reps. Donna Edwards and Chris Van Hollen, two Democrats who had been looking over their shoulder for months to see if Rep. Elijah E. Cummings was looking to join them in the race for retiring Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski’s Senate seat, got the news they were hoping for on Tuesday: He won’t.  Full story

Elijah Cummings Won’t Run for Senate in Maryland

Cummings will run for re-election, not Senate. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Cummings will run for re-election, not Senate. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Maryland Democrat who had been considering a campaign for his state’s open seat in the Senate, said Tuesday he has decided to run instead for a 12th term in Congress.

His public statement came after months of speculation that the Baltimore resident would join Reps. Donna Edwards and Chris Van Hollen in the race for retiring Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski’s seat, a race in which polling suggested he would enter as the front-runner. Full story

By Eli Yokley Posted at 9:24 a.m.
Md. Senate, Md.-7

Who’s Afraid of John Thune? So Far, Everybody

UNITED STATES - JANUARY 12 - Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., speaks during the first weekly luncheon press conference of the year, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Thune ran unopposed in 2010. This time, Democrats in South Dakota are trying to challenge him. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

South Dakota Democrats are still looking for a candidate to challenge Republican incumbent Sen. John Thune, and don’t seem to be having an easy time recruiting one in the strongly conservative state.

Thune famously beat former Senate Minority Leader Thomas Daschle in 2004, and in 2010, Thune ran without a Democratic opponent. At the time of his first reelection campaign, the former South Dakota Senate Minority Leader and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Scott Heidepriem told a local paper “we just concluded that John Thune is an extremely popular Senator who is going to win another term in the Senate.”

South Dakota Democrats aren’t ceding the race this time, said Michael Ewald, communication director for the party. But he also said he could not give names of potential candidates at the moment: “There are multiple people.” Full story

Liz Cheney ‘Taking Nothing for Granted’ in Second Campaign

Cheney. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Cheney is running for Wyoming’s sole seat in the House. (Photo by Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Liz Cheney has many of the things one might hope to have when launching a campaign for Congress in a state as red as Wyoming.

As a Fox News contributor and author, she built a national profile she could use to leverage support from conservative donors. She has past, though unsuccessful, experience running for office. And she has a last name that is still revered in parts of the Republican electorate because of her father, former Vice President Dick Cheney, who served a decade in the same seat.

Full story

What We Learned From the Iowa Caucuses

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Rubio plays with his children Monday after addressing supporters at a caucus night party in Des Moines. (Pete Marovich/Getty Images)

The first contest in the 2016 presidential election ended with Republican Sen. Ted Cruz winning the angry vote over Donald Trump while Sen. Marco Rubio’s strong showing made him the party’s establishment favorite. The two Democrats battled to a “virtual tie,” as Sen. Bernard Sanders put it.

The race on the GOP side had been predicted to be a tight one between Cruz and Trump but Rubio’s close third-place finish was the surprise of the night. Sanders’ performance against Hillary Clinton, finishing just a few tenths of a point behind the former secretary of state, will make that fight for the nomination a longer one.

Full story

Clinton Ekes Out Narrow Win, Cruz Stuns GOP Field

DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 01:  Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) stands with his wife Heidi as he addresses supporters after winning at the caucus night gathering at the Iowa State Fairgrounds on February 1, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. Cruz beat out frontrunner Donald Trump and Marco Rubio (R-FL) to win the Iowa caucuses. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Cruz claims victory in Des Moines on Monday as his wife Heidi listens. (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

In what Iowa party leaders are calling the closest Democratic caucus ever, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton managed a narrow victory, securing 49.9 percent of the vote to Vermont Sen. Bernard Sanders’ 49.6 percent. The third Democratic candidate, former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, received less than 1 percent of the vote and suspended his campaign.

Full story

Dust Begins to Settle in Iowa With Clinton Edge

Becker, right, said “there’s probably going to be squabbles” about the missing votes. (Photo Courtesy Brent Roske)

DES MOINES, Iowa — After a tense night and early morning trying to account for missing votes in errant precincts, the Iowa Democratic Party declared Tuesday that it had received results from 100 percent of the state’s precincts and could confirm a razor-thin victory for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Late on Monday night, the party informed the campaigns of Clinton and Sen. Bernard Sanders that it had no results for 90 precincts across the state, which could account for as much as 5 percent of the total vote. The party asked the campaigns for help in getting a tally for those missing results. Then around noon Tuesday, central time, the Iowa Democratic party said 100 percent of precincts were reporting, sealing Clinton’s win. Full story

February 1, 2016

The Caucuses: Bringing the World to Iowa

The Iowa State Historical Museum hosts six caucuses. (Jason Dick/CQ Roll Call)

The Iowa State Historical Museum hosts six caucuses. (Jason Dick/CQ Roll Call)

DES MOINES, Iowa — The Iowa State Historic Museum went from virtually deserted at 6 p.m. Monday to teaming with about 1,000 caucus-goers by 7 p.m, all of them streaming into one of six precincts — three Democratic and three Republican — as the Hawkeye State officially kicked off the 2016 presidential campaign.

By 7:30, Precinct 55 Democrats in the museum’s Cowles-Kruidenier Auditorium had so packed the 500-capacity venue that all observers were asked to leave. By 8:15, the chants of “Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” came out.
Full story

With Wednesday Deadline Looming, Cummings Hasn’t Filed for Office in Maryland

Cummings has been a constant media presence as turmoil in Baltimore continues (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Cummings, at left, still has not decided whether he will run for Senate or re-election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated: 5:52 p.m. | If you were browsing the Maryland Board of Elections website midday on Monday, you might have thought you’d stumbled upon some news.

For at least a couple hours, the board’s official website showed that Rep. Elijah E. Cummings — the Democrat considering joining the competitive Democratic primary for the seat being vacated by Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski — had filed for re-election in the state’s 7th District, with just two days to spare until Wednesday night’s filing deadline.

But according to an email to Roll Call by Cummings and a Roll Call interview with Jared DeMarinis, the director of candidacy and campaign finance at the board, Cummings did not, in fact, file the paperwork. The website, Cummings said, was “not accurate.”  Full story

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